Saturday, December 1, 2012

Oaty Chili Meatloaf - Power Food


This week, our Power Food is oats.  I don't like oatmeal and avoided oats, for years, until, I started adding oats, as toppings for crisps.  Then, I bravely threw them into other dishes as a filler.  This time, they are used for this meatloaf.  It is a good choice since it is a lot healthier than many of the fillers, I often use.


Did you know that the ancient Romans regarded oats as a weed fit only for horses and Barbarians? In the 1600's Scottish settlers introduced oats to the US.  Only 5% of the oats grown throughout the  world is used for human consumption, and more often oats are used to feed livestock.

"Oats are a good source of magnesium, selenium, manganese and phosphorous. Oats are also a good source of vitamin B1 and dietary fiber. The protein in oats is almost equivalent to the quality of soy protein, and combined with the dietary fiber, makes it the ideal food to start the day with."

 Oaty Chili Meatloaf

Ingredients :

1 pound lean ground beef

1 pound ground chicken
 1 cup oats

1 egg
1/2 cup organic vegetable broth
1 onion, chopped
1/2 carrot, grated
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon pepper 

1 cup chili sauce for top of loaf

Method:


Preheat oven to 350°F.
Combine beef, chicken, egg, broth, onion, carrot, garlic and pepper.  Mix together.

Place in  loaf pan.
Cover top with chili sauce..
Bake for 1 hour or until meat is no longer pink.
Drain off any fat.

Slice and serve.  Eat and enjoy.

I can't wait to check out our other members to see what they did with oats. Hoping, I can pick up some ideas, which is what happens, each week.  If you are inspired by healthy blogs with delicious recipes, these are the places to go.

 Mireya of My Health Eating Habits - Let her know if you would like to join us.
Alyce from More Time at the Table
Ansh from Spice Roots
Jeanette from Jeanette's Healthy Living
Martha from Simple Nourished Living
Sarah from Everything in the Kitchen Sink
Minnie from TheLady8Home.com


Linked to See Ya in the Gumbo  
  Hearth and Soul     

Ingredients

    • 1 1/2 lbs lean ground beef
    • 1 cup tomato juice
    • 3/4 cup oats, uncooked ( quick or old-fashioned)
    • 1 eggs, slightly beaten
    • 1/4 cup chopped onions
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
    • 1 cup Heinz Chili Sauce, for top

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 350°F.
  2. Combine all ingredients except chili sauce. Mix lightly but thoroughly.
  3. Press into an 8x4-inch loaf pan.
  4. Zigzag top of meatloaf with chili sauce.
  5. Bake for 1 hour or until meat is no longer pink and juices run clear.
  6. Drain and let stand 5 minutes before serving with more chili sauce on the side.








1. Lower Your Cholesterol With Beta-Glucan

Countless studies over the years have shown that oats are a powerful force in lowering your cholesterol and fighting heart disease. Oats contain a soluble fiber known as beta-glucan, which absorb and sweep out cholesterol from your digestive track before it can be absorbed into your blood stream. Starting your day with a warm bowl of oatmeal will provide you with 3 gm of soluble oat fiber, enough to have a noticeable effect on your cholesterol levels! You can also bake bread or cookies with rolled oats, oat flour or oat bran.

2. Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

The insoluble fiber in oats is also useful in lowering your blood sugar and controlling diabetes, especially if you eat whole oat groats, steel-cut oats (also known as Irish or Scottish oats) or even thick rolled oats instead of instant or quick oats. Whole oats, steel-cut oats and thick oats are all less-processed forms of oats, and therefore take longer for your body to break down into sugars. They also take longer to cook--about 45 minutes for whole oat groats, 20 minutes for steel-cut oats, and 5 to 10 minutes for thick rolled oats. Thick rolled oats are simply a slightly chewier version of regular oatmeal, whereas whole oat groats and steel-cut oats will have a different texture altogether. Both steel-cut oats and whole oat groats make a great warm porridge in the morning, but they can serve as the base of many savory dishes when used in place of rice.

3. Vitamins, Minerals, Antioxidants and More

Oats are an awesome source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which helps maintain bowel health, improve digestion and relieve constipation. But there's more to oats than fiber! Oats are also an excellent source of selenium, manganese, tryptophan, phosphorus and thiamin. They're also high iron and are a good source of low-fat protein. Oats contain an antioxidant called avenanthramides, found only in oats, that help protect you against heart disease.

4. Fight Cancer With Oats

A diet rich in whole grains like oats is a vital part of lowering your risk for cancers, especially colorectal cancer, thanks to their generous amounts of fiber, as well as healthy doses of vitamins, antioxidants and other phytonutrients. Oats in particular are rich in lignin--also known as phytoestrogen--which may contribute to a decreased risk of hormone related cancers, particularly breast cancer, but also ovarian cancer and prostate cancer.

5. The Skinny on Oats

The same soluble fiber that lowers your cholesterol and helps maintain your blood sugar can also help you lose weight. This fiber thickens and becomes viscose in your intestines, making you feel fuller longer--if you have a big bowl of oatmeal for breakfast, you're far less likely to indulge in an unhealthy mid-morning snack later in the day. This health benefit isn't just for adults, either--children who regularly eat oatmeal have a lowered risk of obesity later in life.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/4699-need-health-benefits-oats/#ixzz2CP9MiSOD








1. Lower Your Cholesterol With Beta-Glucan

Countless studies over the years have shown that oats are a powerful force in lowering your cholesterol and fighting heart disease. Oats contain a soluble fiber known as beta-glucan, which absorb and sweep out cholesterol from your digestive track before it can be absorbed into your blood stream. Starting your day with a warm bowl of oatmeal will provide you with 3 gm of soluble oat fiber, enough to have a noticeable effect on your cholesterol levels! You can also bake bread or cookies with rolled oats, oat flour or oat bran.

2. Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

The insoluble fiber in oats is also useful in lowering your blood sugar and controlling diabetes, especially if you eat whole oat groats, steel-cut oats (also known as Irish or Scottish oats) or even thick rolled oats instead of instant or quick oats. Whole oats, steel-cut oats and thick oats are all less-processed forms of oats, and therefore take longer for your body to break down into sugars. They also take longer to cook--about 45 minutes for whole oat groats, 20 minutes for steel-cut oats, and 5 to 10 minutes for thick rolled oats. Thick rolled oats are simply a slightly chewier version of regular oatmeal, whereas whole oat groats and steel-cut oats will have a different texture altogether. Both steel-cut oats and whole oat groats make a great warm porridge in the morning, but they can serve as the base of many savory dishes when used in place of rice.

3. Vitamins, Minerals, Antioxidants and More

Oats are an awesome source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which helps maintain bowel health, improve digestion and relieve constipation. But there's more to oats than fiber! Oats are also an excellent source of selenium, manganese, tryptophan, phosphorus and thiamin. They're also high iron and are a good source of low-fat protein. Oats contain an antioxidant called avenanthramides, found only in oats, that help protect you against heart disease.

4. Fight Cancer With Oats

A diet rich in whole grains like oats is a vital part of lowering your risk for cancers, especially colorectal cancer, thanks to their generous amounts of fiber, as well as healthy doses of vitamins, antioxidants and other phytonutrients. Oats in particular are rich in lignin--also known as phytoestrogen--which may contribute to a decreased risk of hormone related cancers, particularly breast cancer, but also ovarian cancer and prostate cancer.

5. The Skinny on Oats

The same soluble fiber that lowers your cholesterol and helps maintain your blood sugar can also help you lose weight. This fiber thickens and becomes viscose in your intestines, making you feel fuller longer--if you have a big bowl of oatmeal for breakfast, you're far less likely to indulge in an unhealthy mid-morning snack later in the day. This health benefit isn't just for adults, either--children who regularly eat oatmeal have a lowered risk of obesity later in life.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/4699-need-health-benefits-oats/#ixzz2CP9MiSOD








1. Lower Your Cholesterol With Beta-Glucan

Countless studies over the years have shown that oats are a powerful force in lowering your cholesterol and fighting heart disease. Oats contain a soluble fiber known as beta-glucan, which absorb and sweep out cholesterol from your digestive track before it can be absorbed into your blood stream. Starting your day with a warm bowl of oatmeal will provide you with 3 gm of soluble oat fiber, enough to have a noticeable effect on your cholesterol levels! You can also bake bread or cookies with rolled oats, oat flour or oat bran.

2. Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

The insoluble fiber in oats is also useful in lowering your blood sugar and controlling diabetes, especially if you eat whole oat groats, steel-cut oats (also known as Irish or Scottish oats) or even thick rolled oats instead of instant or quick oats. Whole oats, steel-cut oats and thick oats are all less-processed forms of oats, and therefore take longer for your body to break down into sugars. They also take longer to cook--about 45 minutes for whole oat groats, 20 minutes for steel-cut oats, and 5 to 10 minutes for thick rolled oats. Thick rolled oats are simply a slightly chewier version of regular oatmeal, whereas whole oat groats and steel-cut oats will have a different texture altogether. Both steel-cut oats and whole oat groats make a great warm porridge in the morning, but they can serve as the base of many savory dishes when used in place of rice.

3. Vitamins, Minerals, Antioxidants and More

Oats are an awesome source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which helps maintain bowel health, improve digestion and relieve constipation. But there's more to oats than fiber! Oats are also an excellent source of selenium, manganese, tryptophan, phosphorus and thiamin. They're also high iron and are a good source of low-fat protein. Oats contain an antioxidant called avenanthramides, found only in oats, that help protect you against heart disease.

4. Fight Cancer With Oats

A diet rich in whole grains like oats is a vital part of lowering your risk for cancers, especially colorectal cancer, thanks to their generous amounts of fiber, as well as healthy doses of vitamins, antioxidants and other phytonutrients. Oats in particular are rich in lignin--also known as phytoestrogen--which may contribute to a decreased risk of hormone related cancers, particularly breast cancer, but also ovarian cancer and prostate cancer.

5. The Skinny on Oats

The same soluble fiber that lowers your cholesterol and helps maintain your blood sugar can also help you lose weight. This fiber thickens and becomes viscose in your intestines, making you feel fuller longer--if you have a big bowl of oatmeal for breakfast, you're far less likely to indulge in an unhealthy mid-morning snack later in the day. This health benefit isn't just for adults, either--children who regularly eat oatmeal have a lowered risk of obesity later in life.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/4699-need-health-benefits-oats/#ixzz2CP9MiSOD








1. Lower Your Cholesterol With Beta-Glucan

Countless studies over the years have shown that oats are a powerful force in lowering your cholesterol and fighting heart disease. Oats contain a soluble fiber known as beta-glucan, which absorb and sweep out cholesterol from your digestive track before it can be absorbed into your blood stream. Starting your day with a warm bowl of oatmeal will provide you with 3 gm of soluble oat fiber, enough to have a noticeable effect on your cholesterol levels! You can also bake bread or cookies with rolled oats, oat flour or oat bran.

2. Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

The insoluble fiber in oats is also useful in lowering your blood sugar and controlling diabetes, especially if you eat whole oat groats, steel-cut oats (also known as Irish or Scottish oats) or even thick rolled oats instead of instant or quick oats. Whole oats, steel-cut oats and thick oats are all less-processed forms of oats, and therefore take longer for your body to break down into sugars. They also take longer to cook--about 45 minutes for whole oat groats, 20 minutes for steel-cut oats, and 5 to 10 minutes for thick rolled oats. Thick rolled oats are simply a slightly chewier version of regular oatmeal, whereas whole oat groats and steel-cut oats will have a different texture altogether. Both steel-cut oats and whole oat groats make a great warm porridge in the morning, but they can serve as the base of many savory dishes when used in place of rice.

3. Vitamins, Minerals, Antioxidants and More

Oats are an awesome source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which helps maintain bowel health, improve digestion and relieve constipation. But there's more to oats than fiber! Oats are also an excellent source of selenium, manganese, tryptophan, phosphorus and thiamin. They're also high iron and are a good source of low-fat protein. Oats contain an antioxidant called avenanthramides, found only in oats, that help protect you against heart disease.

4. Fight Cancer With Oats

A diet rich in whole grains like oats is a vital part of lowering your risk for cancers, especially colorectal cancer, thanks to their generous amounts of fiber, as well as healthy doses of vitamins, antioxidants and other phytonutrients. Oats in particular are rich in lignin--also known as phytoestrogen--which may contribute to a decreased risk of hormone related cancers, particularly breast cancer, but also ovarian cancer and prostate cancer.

5. The Skinny on Oats

The same soluble fiber that lowers your cholesterol and helps maintain your blood sugar can also help you lose weight. This fiber thickens and becomes viscose in your intestines, making you feel fuller longer--if you have a big bowl of oatmeal for breakfast, you're far less likely to indulge in an unhealthy mid-morning snack later in the day. This health benefit isn't just for adults, either--children who regularly eat oatmeal have a lowered risk of obesity later in life.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/4699-need-health-benefits-oats/#ixzz2CP9MiSOD








1. Lower Your Cholesterol With Beta-Glucan

Countless studies over the years have shown that oats are a powerful force in lowering your cholesterol and fighting heart disease. Oats contain a soluble fiber known as beta-glucan, which absorb and sweep out cholesterol from your digestive track before it can be absorbed into your blood stream. Starting your day with a warm bowl of oatmeal will provide you with 3 gm of soluble oat fiber, enough to have a noticeable effect on your cholesterol levels! You can also bake bread or cookies with rolled oats, oat flour or oat bran.

2. Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

The insoluble fiber in oats is also useful in lowering your blood sugar and controlling diabetes, especially if you eat whole oat groats, steel-cut oats (also known as Irish or Scottish oats) or even thick rolled oats instead of instant or quick oats. Whole oats, steel-cut oats and thick oats are all less-processed forms of oats, and therefore take longer for your body to break down into sugars. They also take longer to cook--about 45 minutes for whole oat groats, 20 minutes for steel-cut oats, and 5 to 10 minutes for thick rolled oats. Thick rolled oats are simply a slightly chewier version of regular oatmeal, whereas whole oat groats and steel-cut oats will have a different texture altogether. Both steel-cut oats and whole oat groats make a great warm porridge in the morning, but they can serve as the base of many savory dishes when used in place of rice.

3. Vitamins, Minerals, Antioxidants and More

Oats are an awesome source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which helps maintain bowel health, improve digestion and relieve constipation. But there's more to oats than fiber! Oats are also an excellent source of selenium, manganese, tryptophan, phosphorus and thiamin. They're also high iron and are a good source of low-fat protein. Oats contain an antioxidant called avenanthramides, found only in oats, that help protect you against heart disease.

4. Fight Cancer With Oats

A diet rich in whole grains like oats is a vital part of lowering your risk for cancers, especially colorectal cancer, thanks to their generous amounts of fiber, as well as healthy doses of vitamins, antioxidants and other phytonutrients. Oats in particular are rich in lignin--also known as phytoestrogen--which may contribute to a decreased risk of hormone related cancers, particularly breast cancer, but also ovarian cancer and prostate cancer.

5. The Skinny on Oats

The same soluble fiber that lowers your cholesterol and helps maintain your blood sugar can also help you lose weight. This fiber thickens and becomes viscose in your intestines, making you feel fuller longer--if you have a big bowl of oatmeal for breakfast, you're far less likely to indulge in an unhealthy mid-morning snack later in the day. This health benefit isn't just for adults, either--children who regularly eat oatmeal have a lowered risk of obesity later in life.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/4699-need-health-benefits-oats/#ixzz2CP9MiSOD








1. Lower Your Cholesterol With Beta-Glucan

Countless studies over the years have shown that oats are a powerful force in lowering your cholesterol and fighting heart disease. Oats contain a soluble fiber known as beta-glucan, which absorb and sweep out cholesterol from your digestive track before it can be absorbed into your blood stream. Starting your day with a warm bowl of oatmeal will provide you with 3 gm of soluble oat fiber, enough to have a noticeable effect on your cholesterol levels! You can also bake bread or cookies with rolled oats, oat flour or oat bran.

2. Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

The insoluble fiber in oats is also useful in lowering your blood sugar and controlling diabetes, especially if you eat whole oat groats, steel-cut oats (also known as Irish or Scottish oats) or even thick rolled oats instead of instant or quick oats. Whole oats, steel-cut oats and thick oats are all less-processed forms of oats, and therefore take longer for your body to break down into sugars. They also take longer to cook--about 45 minutes for whole oat groats, 20 minutes for steel-cut oats, and 5 to 10 minutes for thick rolled oats. Thick rolled oats are simply a slightly chewier version of regular oatmeal, whereas whole oat groats and steel-cut oats will have a different texture altogether. Both steel-cut oats and whole oat groats make a great warm porridge in the morning, but they can serve as the base of many savory dishes when used in place of rice.

3. Vitamins, Minerals, Antioxidants and More

Oats are an awesome source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which helps maintain bowel health, improve digestion and relieve constipation. But there's more to oats than fiber! Oats are also an excellent source of selenium, manganese, tryptophan, phosphorus and thiamin. They're also high iron and are a good source of low-fat protein. Oats contain an antioxidant called avenanthramides, found only in oats, that help protect you against heart disease.

4. Fight Cancer With Oats

A diet rich in whole grains like oats is a vital part of lowering your risk for cancers, especially colorectal cancer, thanks to their generous amounts of fiber, as well as healthy doses of vitamins, antioxidants and other phytonutrients. Oats in particular are rich in lignin--also known as phytoestrogen--which may contribute to a decreased risk of hormone related cancers, particularly breast cancer, but also ovarian cancer and prostate cancer.

5. The Skinny on Oats

The same soluble fiber that lowers your cholesterol and helps maintain your blood sugar can also help you lose weight. This fiber thickens and becomes viscose in your intestines, making you feel fuller longer--if you have a big bowl of oatmeal for breakfast, you're far less likely to indulge in an unhealthy mid-morning snack later in the day. This health benefit isn't just for adults, either--children who regularly eat oatmeal have a lowered risk of obesity later in life.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/4699-need-health-benefits-oats/#ixzz2CP9MiSOD

3 comments:

  1. What a great idea to use oats in meatloaf!

    ReplyDelete
  2. A healthy and powerful way to start your day.

    ReplyDelete
  3. A former co-worker taught me to use oats in place of breadcrumbs in meatloaf. I've never gone back to breadcrumbs. Your picture is making me crave meatloaf.
    Thanks for sharing with See Ya in the Gumbo this week.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for visiting and commenting.